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These women deserve People's ‘Most Beautiful’ title more than Julia Roberts

These women deserve People's ‘Most Beautiful’ title more than Julia Roberts
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People Magazine probably thought it was doing something noble when it named Julia Roberts as its "Most Beautiful" woman of 2017. After all, she's nearly 50—practically prehistoric in Hollywood terms, especially compared to the first time she graced the issue's cover in 1991 at the ripe old age of 23. But when you've chosen the same actress a record five times, the tradition starts to seem stale. Society's perception of beauty continues to evolve, but People's formula remains the same. Maybe it's time to shake things up? Here are just five women who've redefined beauty on their own terms, earning them the right to the title (even if they didn't make the list in the first place).

These women deserve People's ‘Most Beautiful’ title more than Julia Roberts

Betty White

One quick glance at the "Most Beautiful" list reveals that Oprah Winfrey's the oldest person on this year's roster. (She's 63.) But why must People perpetuate the notion that youth equals beauty? If age truly isn't an issue for those doling out the title, White surely deserves the honor. (They could've included her, at least.) She's America's sweetheart. She's devoted literal decades to the entertainment world and, at 95, she's still as spry, feisty, and funny as ever. Honestly, she's beautiful in ways that these younger women can only aspire to achieve one day.

These women deserve People's ‘Most Beautiful’ title more than Julia Roberts

Hillary Clinton

When it comes to Clinton, the term "nasty woman" comes to mind. But after the impact she's had on the women's movement in recent months, her legacy will be one of the most beautiful things to emerge from our tumultuous political situation. Though she might've lost the 2016 election, Clinton's attempt to break the glass ceiling has inspired 11,000 women to seek office, while encouraging countless others to fight for their human rights. She embodies the adversity women face every day, yet she still persists. If that sort of resilience and tenacity isn't beautiful, then this world's uglier than we thought.

These women deserve People's ‘Most Beautiful’ title more than Julia Roberts

Laverne Cox

Despite the fact that many people claim they're inclusive, the transgender community has yet to gain complete acceptance throughout society. Cox, however, has been working diligently to fight for both transgender rights and women's rights ever since she broke into the business. She represents the beauty America has to offer, if only we'd take the time to listen and understand, and such an honor could be instrumental in sparking critical conversations. Yes, it'd likely create controversy, but that's precisely why we need to increase transgender visibility. Cox not only deserves the title, but naming her "Most Beautiful" might also help young people struggling with their own transition recognize that they're not alone.

These women deserve People's ‘Most Beautiful’ title more than Julia Roberts

Michelle Obama

Our former First Lady has always been the embodiment of class and dignity. She's beautiful on the outside thanks to her love of physical fitness, and she's beautiful on the inside because she stands up for what she believes in no matter the obstacles. Beyond all else, Mrs. Obama has always been a champion for young girls. She's taught this generation that education and intellectual pursuits are far more important than fixating on your outward appearance. She inspires females of all ages to pursue their passions and ignore the haters. In this instance, beauty isn't just visual—it's mental, too.

These women deserve People's ‘Most Beautiful’ title more than Julia Roberts

Melissa McCarthy

Jerry Lewis once claimed women cannot be funny. But anyone who's witnessed McCarthy's scathing impression of Press Secretary Sean Spicer on SNL knows that assertion couldn't be further from the truth. McCarthy has emerged as one of the leading comedians of our time. While she might've initially won our hearts as Sookie St. James on Gilmore Girls, she has since become one of the most in-demand actresses in the industry (all without some stick-thin figure, mind you). From the looks of things, Chrissy Metz and Adele appear to be the only full figure gals on the list, perpetuating the notion that bigger isn't always considered beautiful. But when "big" applies to the laughs you get from the live studio audience, dress size doesn't (and shouldn't) matter.

Who do you think deserves to be named People's "Most Beautiful" woman? Share your ideas in the comments below!

For feminist fashionistas, has modesty become the best policy?

For feminist fashionistas, has modesty become the best policy?
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When it comes to gender politics within the fashion industry, equality is only as deep as the pockets on your average pair of skinny jeans. Designers continue to break down barriers dictated by the gender binary. However, the persistent pocket disparity — men's apparel features many spacious compartments, while most women's styles don't have any at all — demonstrates that when creating women's clothing, form still outweighs function, highlighting the latent sexism that remains.

However, as the decade wears on, one specific trend has begun to emerge, indicating that women might be hoping to reclaim comfort and promote feminism simultaneously.

According to The New York Times' recent feature, modesty has made its triumphant return. Vanessa Friedman writes that long sleeves and ankle-length hemlines now dominate the industry because, as we move into the last years of this decade, fashion now serves as the surrogate for our social and political discontent. Friedman explains that "clothes are an integral part of the debate over the freedom to make your own choices — whether about what you do with your body or who touches your body or what you put on your body." Clothing still acts as an alternative mouthpiece, much like it has throughout history, except its message has changed dramatically thanks to the current state of affairs.

For feminist fashionistas, has modesty become the best policy?

Lucie Greene, worldwide director of the innovation group at J. Walter Thompson, tells Friedman that the emerging trends exist in an effort to “reject the strictures of the male gaze.” While women once saw plunging necklines and transparent fabrics as vessels for embracing their sexuality, they've come to recognize that such styles ultimately put them on display in ways that contradict their underlying intentions.

“They are not about what men want anymore, but about what women want," Greene adds. After years of embracing styles spawned by the male libido, women are opting for clothes that cater to comfort and security. Because, while comfort supports increased confidence, security provides strength in an era where women are still perceived as weak and inferior.

By gravitating toward modest styles, women are taking their bodies back. From Hillary Clinton's symbolic suffragette white pantsuits, to the pussycat hats of the Women's March on Washington, women's clothing needs no comment for these choices speak for themselves. Fashion statements abound, but not in the ways we've come to expect. Instead of waiting for the next red carpet blunder or wardrobe malfunction, women now feel both fashionable and comfortable as they trade their crop tops for button downs.

For feminist fashionistas, has modesty become the best policy?

As Michael Kors, the esteemed designer, told The New York Times, he's "convinced that there is something far more alluring about women wearing things that give them confidence, that don’t make them feel as if they have to tug at their hemlines or yank at their straps.”

While some women dress to impress men, and others dress to impress their female peers, many now focus solely on dressing for their own benefit. They've replaced their high heels with ballet flats because they regain balance both literally and figuratively when they're on solid ground. They've traded their mini dresses for pencil skirts because they no longer feel they must flaunt their sexuality in order to command their femininity. Of course, while no woman should feel compelled to conceal her body because she fears the advances of predatory men, modest styles promise to empower women to be who they are, not who others wish them to be.

Photos courtesy of Getty Images

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Keepin' it short since 1987.