GO / GIRL / GOALS
1BB34097-F786-44E7-9A1A-E8A05C0914DB
Burger
GO / GIRL / GOALS
1BB34097-F786-44E7-9A1A-E8A05C0914DB
Burger
GO / GIRL / GOALS
ic-spinner
Everyone has a story to tell
Find the best stories to read and people to follow. Get inspired and start writing great stories yourself or with your friends. Share and let the world know.

5 Feminist Anthologies to Inspire Your Woman Warrior

Girl up. The feminist movement is more alive than ever, with women learning to stand up against inequality, violence and workplace discrimination. Some take it to the streets and some use words. If you're looking for something to help you embrace your womanhood and become a better, braver version of you, here are five new feminist anthologies that will serve as inspiration.

Want to be a co-author?
Request co-authorship ▸

“Here We Are: Feminism for the Real World” by Kelly Jansen

5 Feminist Anthologies to Inspire Your Woman Warrior

Forty four creatives from all walks of life contribute in this treasure trove of fiction, poems, lists, comics, illustrations and essays meant to encourage body positivity, romance, gender identity and girl friendships. Packed with diverse views on what feminism is all about, this could be your go-to book when you're running out of steam for your self-confidence. The variety of content makes it a fun read, and can be enjoyed by women, and men, of all ages and beliefs.

Buy it on Amazon

“Dead Feminists: Historic Heroines in Living Color” by Chandler O'Leary

5 Feminist Anthologies to Inspire Your Woman Warrior

Go back in time by exploring the lives of some of the world’s most famous women in this wonder of a book. Here, O'Leary visually highlights 27 brave and beautiful personalities who made a remarkable difference in their respective fields. Archival photographs, original posters and new art retell the stories of Eleanor Roosevelt, Rachel Carson, Queen Lili'uokalani and Virginia Woolf among others.

Buy it on Amazon

“Women in Science: 50 Fearless Pioneers Who Changed the World” by Rachel Ignotofsky

5 Feminist Anthologies to Inspire Your Woman Warrior

Who says women should stay at home? The fascinating females in this book broke society-imposed limitations and led various discoveries in the fields of science, engineering, mathematics and medicine. If you want to trigger the feminist geek in you, this is your best read. Fun infographics, beautiful art and a scientific glossary will keep you glued. Profiles include Jane Goodall, Alice Ball, Esther Lederberg and Katherine Johnson, the physicist who calculated the trajectory of the 1969 Apollo 11 mission to the moon.

Buy this on Amazon

“Good Night Stories for Rebel Girls” by Elena Favili

5 Feminist Anthologies to Inspire Your Woman Warrior

Here's a powerful anthology to inspire your little princess to be less of a damsel in distress before she goes to bed, as 100 stories from 100 outstanding women are retold in a fairytale narrative, packed with full-color portraits. With profiles from past to present, you can help her find her favorite heroine —and be one herself —by fostering similar values and a brave heart.

Buy this on Amazon

“1001 Knights” by Annie Stoll and Kevin Jay Stanton

5 Feminist Anthologies to Inspire Your Woman Warrior

Art director Annie Stoll and Signature Shakespeare illustrator Kevin Jay Stanton gather more than 250 artists, poets and fiction writers in a massive three-volume anthology inspired by courage, friendship and wisdom. Each feature carries people-positive values and feminist undertones, with a unique representation of what being a knight is all about. After its successful crowdfunding via Kickstarter, copies of the books will be available through the contributing artists.

See more information

What Is Impostor Syndrome and How Does It Affect Your Career?

What Is Impostor Syndrome and How Does It Affect Your Career?
Want to be a co-author?
Request co-authorship ▸

In today's fast paced, fake-it-’til-you-make-it world, many young achievers are wading through a sea of self-doubt. Perhaps you've had similar struggles; you start questioning yourself whether you deserve that promotion, whether your work is good enough, or if you could bea good role model for the youth. You may also worry that people will find out you’re living under the guise of perfection.

According to the International Journal of Behavioral Science, 70 percent of people feel that they are living under a pretense and fear of being busted. This fear has been given a name: The Impostor Syndrome.

Pauline Clanse and Suzanne Imes coined the term in 1978, describing it as a feeling of "phoniness in people who believe that they are not intelligent, capable or creative despite high achievement." It's oxymoronic — a sense of helplessness and inadequacy despite success. Many brilliant people (including actresses Kate Winslet and Emma Watson, as well as celebrated writer Maya Angelou) have felt this way, though.

It doesn't matter who you are or what you do; this syndrome strikes at any given time. Millennials, the study reports, are more prone to this. Thanks to technology, one can easily put out a perfect façade by altering photos, gaining a social media reputation and becoming an online sensation. There’s comparison and societal pressures too, and if you’re starting to question why you’re perfectly organized Instagram feed does not reflect the real you, this may be the Impostor Syndrome creeping in.

How to discern this fear? Sufferers go back and forth in questioning their credentials and find them worthless. This could wind up leading to anxiety and even depression. In order to find relief, they will end up either overworking or procrastinating. As a result, their career, mental and physical health are at risk.

Don’t let the Impostor Syndrome take over your self-confidence. Once you feel it kicking in, kick it back to the curb by taking these steps:

  1. The Impostor Syndrome is no false modesty. Humility is healthy, but not when it paralyzes and keeps you from seeing the value you provide. What do you need to do? Own your success. Stop rejecting props and praises given to you. Be grateful. Let it sink in, then move on to another great opportunity
  2. Stop comparing. You’re here to complement, not to compete. The things you offer — your administrative skills, compassion, brilliance, character — are helpful to your workplace, and even to society. Everyone can dish out something special. The world will never run out of space for creative things.
  3. Keep the messages that touch your heart. When your doubt starts telling you that you’re not worth it, hold on to the things that remind you otherwise. Keep a screenshot of good reviews of your work. File letters from family and friends. Write down the praises your boss gave you.

Once you empower yourself and recognize your worth in this big, growing constellation of creativity, there’s no way you’d go back to self-depreciation. Cheers to you!

You've read the story folder
Story cover
written by
Writer avatar
cariscruz
Caris is a writer, illustrator and photographer. Follow on Twitter and on Instagram (@hellocaris) or visit her blog, hellocaris.com