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NASA Snaps Amazing Close-up Shot Of Antarctica’s Massive Iceberg [IMAGES]

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NASA Snaps Amazing Close-up Shot Of Antarctica’s Massive Iceberg [IMAGES]

Last July, the world saw the amazing satellite images that showed an iceberg bigger than the state of Delaware drifting away from Antarctica’s ice shelf. Now it’s summertime in Antarctica, which is allowing scientists to view the massive ice structure up close.

According to Gizmodo, the ice behemoth is known as “iceberg A-68” and weighs “about a trillion tons and features a surface area of 2,240 square miles (5,800 square kilometers).”

The iceberg is slowly drifting away from the Larsen C ice shelf and heading towards the South Georgia and South Sandwich Islands.

“As it floats away from the Antarctic Peninsula, A-68 is splintering and forming more icebergs in the process,” Gizmodo reported.

NASA Snaps Amazing Close-up Shot Of Antarctica’s Massive Iceberg [IMAGES]
NASA Snaps Amazing Close-up Shot Of Antarctica’s Massive Iceberg [IMAGES]

Last Sunday, NASA began taking photos of the berg in Operation Icebridge, a mission to “produce detailed 3D maps of Antarctic and Arctic polar ice” and “flew a P-3 aircraft armed with a sophisticated array of measuring instruments to take a closer look.” In addition to taking photos, Operational Icebridge scientists are trying to measure the depth of water below iceberg by using a gravimeter.

Now the images have come back for us all to view – and they are as spectacular as anyone could have imagined.

One scientists told media, “A-68 is so expansive it appears if it were still part of the ice shelf.”

“But if you look far into the distance you can see a thin line of water between the iceberg and where the new front of the shelf begins. A small part of the flight today took us down the front of iceberg A-68, its towering edge reflecting in the dark Weddell Sea.”

NASA Snaps Amazing Close-up Shot Of Antarctica’s Massive Iceberg [IMAGES]
NASA Snaps Amazing Close-up Shot Of Antarctica’s Massive Iceberg [IMAGES]

Scientists now ultra-clear pictures of A-68, which will help them track and study its progress moving forward.

See and read more at the NASA Earth Observatory.