ДРУГОЕ

5 melhores livros sobre Economia Comportamental

Italo Julius Camargo Santos
Author
Italo Julius Camargo Santos

1 - Predictably Irrational - Dan Ariely

Irrational behavior is a part of human nature, but as MIT professor Ariely has discovered in 20 years of researching behavioral economics, people tend to behave irrationally in a predictable fashion. Drawing on psychology and economics, behavioral economics can show us why cautious people make poor decisions about sex when aroused, why patients get greater relief from a more expensive drug over its cheaper counterpart and why honest people may steal office supplies or communal food, but not money. According to Ariely, our understanding of economics, now based on the assumption of a rational subject, should, in fact, be based on our systematic, unsurprising irrationality. Ariely argues that greater understanding of previously ignored or misunderstood forces (emotions, relativity and social norms) that influence our economic behavior brings a variety of opportunities for reexamining individual motivation and consumer choice, as well as economic and educational policy. Ariely's intelligent, exuberant style and thought-provoking arguments make for a fascinating, eye-opening read.

Here is the Ted Talk Video from Dan Ariely the Predictably Irraction Author's

https://www.ted.com/talks/dan_ariely_asks_are_we_in_control_of_our_own_decisions?language=en

2 - Nudge - Richard H. Thaler

Nudge theory (or Nudge) is a concept in behavioural science, political theory and economics which argues that positive reinforcement and indirect suggestions to try to achieve non-forced compliance can influence the motives, incentives and decision making of groups and individuals, at least as effectively – if not more effectively – than direct instruction, legislation, or enforcement.

Nudge theory's most celebrated influences include the formation of a British Behavioural Insights Team, often called the ‘Nudge Unit’, at the British Cabinet Office, headed by Dr David Halpern[1] and US President Barack Obama's appointment of Cass R. Sunstein as administrator of the Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs.[2][3][4] In Australia, the government of New South Wales established a Behavioural Insights community of practice.

The "Nudge" idea has been criticised. Dr Tammy Boyce, from public health foundation The King's Fund, has said:

We need to move away from short-term, politically motivated initiatives such as the 'nudging people' idea, which are not based on any good evidence and don't help people make long-term behaviour changes.[5]