Scientists Propose Diet That Cuts Meat And Sugar To Half

 

An international team of scientists has developed a diet it says can improve health while ensuring sustainable food production to minimize further damage to the environment.

The "planetary health diet" is based on cutting red meat and sugar consumption in half and increasing intake of fruits, vegetables, and nuts, according to reports on

And it can prevent up to 11.6 million premature deaths without harming the planet, says the report published Wednesday in the medical journal The Lancet.

The authors warn that a global change in diet and food production is needed as 3 billion people across the world are malnourished – including those who are under and overnourished – and food production is overstepping environmental targets, driving climate change, biodiversity loss, and pollution.

The world's population is set to reach 10 billion people by 2050; that growth, in addition to our current diet and food production habits, will "exacerbate risks to people and planet," according to the authors.

"The stakes are very high," Dr. Richard Horton, editor in chief at The Lancet, said of the report's findings, noting that 1 billion people live in hunger and 2 billion people eat too much of the wrong foods.

Horton believes that "nutrition has still failed to get the kind of political attention that is given to diseases such as AIDS, tuberculosis, malaria."

"Using best available evidence" of controlled feeding studies, randomized trials and large cohort studies, the authors came up with a new recommendation, explained Dr. Walter Willett, lead author of the paper and a professor of epidemiology and nutrition at the Harvard T.H. Chan school of public health.

The report suggests five strategies to ensure people can change their diets and not harm the planet in doing so: encouraging people to eat healthier, shifting global production toward varied crops, intensifying agriculture sustainably, stricter rules around the governing of oceans and lands, and reducing food waste.

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StoriaHealth

Bill Gates Launches Ambitious Toilet Program

Imagine a billionaire entrepreneur and philanthropist speaking at a conference with a jar of human poop beside him. That’s Microsoft founder Bill Gates in reality as he spoke of a global initiative on stage in Beijing on Tuesday.

Showcasing human excrement was part of his speech at the Reinvented Toilet Expo event, a forum for new toilet technologies,

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StoriaHealth

All Ye Folks, Sleep Tight

Sleep helps us get a handle on our emotions by activating the amygdala, the brain’s emotional core.

Research has shown that sleep helps us process emotions. Sleep plays a key role in making sense of information based on experiences from the day. Therefore, getting enough sleep is critical for preserving memories. Emotional memories are unique because of the way they trigger the amygdala,

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StoriaHealth

Should Email On Weekends Be Banned?

For the average working person, switching off work at the end of the day is a relief and joy.

But experts say we’re increasingly failing to do so, instead bringing leftover work home with us and fielding emails during our personal time. Unsurprisingly, this routine has some negative consequences, according to a BBC feature.

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StoriaHealth

There Is No Safe Level Of Drinking, Study Says

There's no amount of liquor, wine, or beer that is safe for one's overall health, according to a new analysis of global alcohol consumption and disease risk.

Alcohol was the leading risk factor for disease and premature death in men and women between the ages of 15 and 49 worldwide in 2016, according to the study, published Thursday in the journal The Lancet, report

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